Why Book A Chicago Date, 5 Venues Why

Blog, MUSIC.

Think of music hubs and London, New York and Los Angeles always come to mind. But when bands announce tours, what’s the one city they never miss? Chicago. Bands choose The Windy City partly because it’s a massive hub for music, but mostly because of the Chicago’s incredible venues. Never been to a music venue in Chicago? Check out the five best music venues below.

1. The Riviera is a plain classic. Walking through the lit up banner that displays “The Riviera,” concertgoers are transported to the old days with a general admission standing area and a large balcony. Curtains hang from the side of the private boxes and the decorated ceiling stands out in the large room. As the lights go down and the band takes the stage, The Riviera packs a punch in the sound quality and is easily known as one of the best music venues in Chicago.

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The Riviera’s marquee showcases that night’s lineup and is often a favorite Instagram for most concertgoers.

2. The Aragon Ballroom is a castle. As you cross the train platform and head down the stairs, “The Aragon” sign stands out against the small street. Walking into the building no one expects a castle. Quite literally, the venue boasts turrets on all four sides and a ceiling painted like the sky. Notable sold out shows include Ellie Goulding, Phoenix, alt-J and even Olly Murs. Although the venue isn’t air conditioned (it was built in 1926), The Aragon Ballroom is a popular destination for some of the biggest artists.

Molly Tullis, a Chicago Blogger, touches on her favorite Aragon Ballroom experience.

3. Lincoln Hall is tiny (in a good way). When someone says a music venue is tiny, it is not always a good thing. But in Lincoln Hall’s case, the small enclosed space behind a bar allows fans to be in breathing distance of their favorite bands. Every year during festival season, some of the biggest names in music chose to play their Lollapalooza after parties at Lincoln Hall. Death Cab for Cutie and Fall Out Boy have both played the small venue in celebration of album releases, selling out in seconds. The venue recently sold to Audioleaf and hopes to grow to become more mainstream. “My intention is to provide […] Lincoln Hall with more resources,” Michael Johnston, 31, told the Chicago Tribune. He plans to add live-streaming to the small venue for an added bonus.

The intimate space of Lincoln Hall allows anyone to feel like they’re next to the artist.

4. The Vic Theatre is just plain different. Known for concerts as well as movie screenings and an incredible stage set up, The Vic Theatre is located in the heart of Lincoln Park. But with that location comes restrictions. One of the only music venues in Chicago to have a curfew, The Vic has hosted artists like Fifth Harmony and Bleachers (Jack Antonoff of Fun.) in the past year and continues to surprise its guests with a variety of acts.

The Vic Theater lies in one of the most residential areas on Lincoln Park.

The Vic Theater lies in one of the most residential areas on Lincoln Park.

5. UIC Pavilion brings in big talent. For any solid indie fan, arena shows are avoided and often skipped. But when Passion Pit announced a show at UIC Pavilion, tickets sold out instantly. Although it is a university’s college basketball arena, UIC Pavilion boasts a huge lighting set-up and a powerful sound system. The basketball court is used as a general admission area and the total capacity of the arena is 9,500.

Passion Pit at UIC Pavilion proved to be a light spectacle as well as a music show.

Passion Pit at UIC Pavilion proved to be a light spectacle as well as a music show.

Find a music venue you loved but its not listed below? Drop a note below in the comments.

11 Photos On The Chicago Fashion Foundation Presentation

Blog, fashion, photography

Every fashion blogger in Chicago was out and about on Thursday, April 2nd, 2015 at the Chicago Cultural Center. The 8th Annual Design Competition and Showcase entitled “A City Within a City” included a prize of $50,000 for the winner of the competition and even had a few surprises. Check out my 11 photos from the event below:

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All Photos by Addie Whelan

Whats your favorite look? Comment below!

How To Be a Concert Photographer

Blog, Uncategorized

Ever wonder how people with big cameras end up in front of the barricade at concerts? They are concert photographers. If you, like a lot of people want to be like them, read on. Here are five steps towards being a true concert photographer:

Everyone has been there. Concert attendees wait in line at 10 A.M. for a 7 P.M. show just to get front row. As the light dims, suddenly a guy or girl comes in the very front with a camera. There’s a sticker on their shirts with “PHOTO” written across it. Most likely, these photographers are shooting for a publication (like a newspaper or magazine) but started out just as small.

  1. Invest in a decent camera. Even though this one is a given, a DSLR (Digital Single-Lens Reflex) camera can make a huge difference in your photos. Besides the aspect of quality, having all of the settings can help to create a masterpiece. Most photographers find that a high shutter speed (meaning the camera takes a photo very fast) creates sharper photos and often catches the guitar players hand in mid-action rather than a blur. If you’ve ever learned about photography in the past, aperture (the amount of light let into the lens) is a well-known topic to you. DSLR cameras allow a low aperture, meaning an immense amount of light can enter the lens each time the shutter button is pressed.
  1. Start Small. While most of the big photographers are known to shoot at arenas like Red Rocks Amphitheater and United Center, the best place to really get a feel for concert photography is at smaller shows. A tip of advice, it might be a smaller lighting set up, but most small venues do not check bags, which in photographer language, means you can bring a camera into the venue. Although the lighting will not be as good as a nicer, bigger venue, most of those shows are limited to who brings a camera in. Todd Owyong, photography expert and site owner of “ishootshows.com” agrees with this statement, “Smaller music venues often have few or no camera restrictions, so it’s possible to build a great portfolio shooting at these clubs and dives – no photo passes required.”
  1. Learn the basic settings. There are four settings on a DSLR that most photographers need to know, followed by their abbreviations: Auto (Auto), Manual (M), Shutter (S), and Aperture (A). Here’s the basic breakdown to each setting:
  • Auto – the camera is doing all of the work for you
  • Manual – you are controlling every aspect of the camera
  • Shutter – the camera is focusing more on how fast the photo is being taken
  • Aperture – the camera is focusing more on how much light is allowed into the lens

Once photography becomes second nature, most photographers use Manual. But for most beginner photographers, a good place to start is Auto (without the flash). Once you’ve gotten a handle on learning the ins and outs of handling your camera, you can learn to experiment with more settings. Here are a few tutorials to read more.

Tutorial 1

Tutorial 2

  1. Listen to experts. Owyong gives a great piece of advice for beginners and says “If you shoot what you love, it will show in the images. Even if you’re just shooting shows on the barricade with a point [and] shoot at first, passion for one’s subjects always translates into better images.” A poll asked 2,000 concert photographers what their own expert advice was to a beginner. Here’s what they had to say:
  1. Learn a bit of Adobe Photoshop or Lightroom. Although a lot of photographers have taken classes on Photoshop, many are self-taught. There are a few basic components and with a simple Google search on Lightroom, you too can know the basics. A photo are quickly fixed by a few clicks of the mouse and often teaches you about what needs to be changed in order to improve your images in the future.

Now, these 5 steps won’t change the way you see photography overnight. It might take a few shows to learn how to shoot in different modes or switch out your phone for a camera. But even if you buy a nice camera, its all about what you see with your eye. Owyoung has always lived by one piece of advice: “Having the best lenses and cameras only makes the technical exercises of live music photography easier; they don’t make you a better photographer, and they certainly won’t teach you composition.” Sometimes at the door things will happen too. Security will often say no cameras without permission from the venue or band playing. Take this as a learning curve, check that venue off the list and try a new one. Some of the best learning is done by trial and error, and at smaller shows, more trial is often accepted as well as more errors are often accepted. Don’t forget when you have found your favorite image, to post it so others can see. Here’s one of our favorites.

Photo Credit: Addie Whelan Ben Howard rock's The Riviera in Chicago with a sold-out crowd.

Photo Credit: Addie Whelan
Ben Howard rock’s The Riviera in Chicago with a sold-out crowd.

Where have you found the best advice for future photographers?

Come Back To Music Tom DeLonge, 5 Reasons Why

Blog, MUSIC., New Music

Tom DeLonge has always dealt with heartache by the numbers. He started two bands, had two life-changing events, and has been creating music for more than 20 years. He decided to quit music for the rest of his life and left one note on his Facebook page to explain his reasoning.

DeLonge knew people wouldn’t take the news easily, so his explanation attempted to put his fans at ease. He wrote that he “never planned on quitting” and he “just find it hard as hell to commit.” But after he wrote one of the most emotional letters in music history, is there a way to make him stay? Here are five reasons why he should stay:

  1. He’s created mountains of music. DeLonge is credited on almost every Blink-182 album as “composer,” meaning that he does a majority of the work. And if he has not written enough, he has written for numerous other groups, including his own other projects. DeLonge created Angels & Airwaves in 2005, just after he experienced an emotional breakthrough. DeLonge created the band and produced five albums, resulting in multiple albums on the Billboard Top 200 list. While both Blink-182 and Angels & Airwaves consisted of more than a few members, DeLonge wrote all of the lyrics himself.
    1. He’s dealt with addiction and music is his coping mechanism. After a serious back injury, DeLonge was prescribed Vicodin for pain, but after a while became addicted to the medication. When the prescription ran out and he began to go through withdrawal, DeLonge turned to music to find his way back to safety. Music has helped some of the biggest names in music go through addictions and dependency and DeLonge does not doubt it changed the way he lives his life. Check out his interview below to see what he had to say about his struggles:
  1. His business ventures didn’t actually turn out well. DeLonge attempted to start several businesses in the midst of playing music, but never successfully made a tremendous amount of sales. He directed a few music videos, started a shoe line, tried to start a clothing line, and even tried to create his own guitar brand. DeLonge publicized the brands via his social media (Twitter, Facebook, YouTube), but none of them truly took off. 

4. His voice is incredible. With an angelic voice like DeLonge’s, how could anyone let him leave music? Belting classics like Blink-182’s “All the Small Things” and “Saturday Love” from Angels & Airwaves fourth album, DeLonge has won numerous awards for his music. He even guest-appeared doing backup vocals for some non-released tracks. Blink-182 was even nominated as the one of the best bands of the year, multiple times.

5. He influenced a significant amount of what is now rock music. Some of the biggest names in music have cited DeLonge as their main musical inspiration. Just to drop a few names, two members of Panic! At the Disco (known for “I Write Sins But Not Tragedies”) say that Tom DeLonge has highly influenced their style of music. In an interview with Rolling Stone magazine, Ryan Ross of PATD said that he “wants to learn to play guitar like Tom DeLonge.” 

If that does not sum up the number of reasons Tom DeLonge should stay in music, there might not be many more, but if you’ve got an answer, sound off in the comments below!

If you didn’t read his original Facebook post, check it out here.

Haven’t heard of Tom DeLonge? Check out some of the most popular songs below!